The ethical view on cloning

We concluded that in general this is not advisable, because on reaching maturity the child may feel morally compromised by having been made to contribute to a cloning procedure. According to some studies, ovulation-stimulating drugs The ethical view on cloning also been associated with a heightened risk for ovarian cancer.

To be sure, parents do and must try to form and mold their children in various ways as they inure them to the demands of family life, prepare them for adulthood, and initiate them into the human community. The surgery to retrieve the eggs also carries risks, such as the dangers of general anesthesia and bleeding.

Our analysis will then move onto questions dealing with the effects of cloning on individuals, family life, and society more generally.

Why does this matter. Thus, large-scale cloning might prove to be a serious blow to the entire human race in future. Given the risks, and the fact that consent cannot be obtained, the ethically correct choice may be to avoid the experiment.

Cloning Ethics

By considering these other ways in which cloning would constitute an experiment, we could enlarge our analysis of the ethics of research with human subjects to assess possible nonbodily harms of cloning-to-produce-children. It is also a technology, a human experiment, and an exercise of freedom, among other things.

The Ethical Considerations

Where the progenitor is a genetic near-twin, surely the urge of the cloned child to connect with the unknown "parent" would be still greater. Over the years, cloning has come to mean an artificial and identical genetic copy of an existing life form. How should these issues be raised, and within what moral framework.

Yet the fact of success in that case does not establish precedent in this one, nor does it mean that the first attempts at IVF were not in fact unethical experiments upon the unborn, despite the fortunate results.

Procreation as traditionally understood invites acceptance, rather than reshaping, engineering, or designing the next generation. Children born of this process stand equally beside their progenitors as fellow human beings, not beneath them as made objects.

The cloned child may be constantly compared to "the original," and may consciously or unconsciously hold himself or herself up to the genetic twin that came before.

Results of animal studies suggest that reproductive cloning of humans would similarly pose a high risk to the health of both fetus or infant and mother and lead to associated psychological risks for the mother as a consequence of late spontaneous abortions or the birth of a stillborn child or a child with severe health problems.

This concern presumes that reproductive cloning is and always will be ethically wrong. In such cases, it may become harder to see the child solely as a gift bestowed upon the parents' mutual self-giving and not to some degree as a product of their parental wills.

Ethics of cloning

The usually clear designations of father and brother, mother and sister, would be confounded. But therapeutic cloning remains totally unacceptable to such people because it involves the deliberate creation of what they deem to be a human being in order to destroy it.

Many who do not accord moral status to the entities produced by therapeutic cloning disagree with that view.

The ethical view on cloning

Martin Robra, executive secretary of the World Council of Churches would prefer a moratorium on cloning until all of the ethical questions can be resolved. I am thinking in particular of attempts at human cloning with a view to obtaining organs for transplants. In bioethics, the ethics of cloning refers to a variety of ethical positions regarding the practice and possibilities of cloning, especially human cloning.

While many of these views are religious in origin, some of the questions raised by cloning are faced by secular perspectives as well.

Never let me clone?: Countering an ethical argument against the reproductive cloning of humans

The type of cloning that is the focus of much ethical controversy involves the generation of cloned embryos, particularly those of humans, which are genetically identical to the organisms from which they are derived, and the subsequent use of these embryos. In bioethics, the ethics of cloning refers to a variety of ethical positions regarding the practice and possibilities of cloning, especially human cloning.

While many of these views are religious in origin, some of the questions raised by cloning are faced by secular perspectives as well. Perspectives on human cloning are theoretical, as human therapeutic and reproductive cloning are not commercially used;.

Tremendous debate was stirred by the announcement of the successful cloning of a sheep from a differentiated somatic cell. One result was that the National Bioethics Advisory Commission was asked by the president of the United States to report on the ethical and legal issues arising from the.

The ethical view on cloning
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To Clone or not to Clone: The Ethical Question